___Race Snippets

 

51st Tour de France 1964

 
   
 

By Barry Boyce CyclingRevealed Historian

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anquetil verses Poulidor, an Epic Battle

Defending champion Jacques Anquetil came to the 1964 Tour de France in search of an unprecedented fifth championship. Anquetil started the race with tired legs. He had just won the Giro d'Italia for the second time and hoped to equal Fausto Coppi's (1949 and 1952) Tour-Giro double (winning the Tour and Giro in the same year).

Tour organizers again formulated the race for climbers and hs main rival Raymond “Pou Pou” Poulidor had great fitness. The Tour started to climb on stages 7 in the Alps and the contenders came to the front of the race. Raymond Poulidor consistently attacked Anquetil's tired leg on the early stages and slowly gained 58 seconds on the defending champion.

The last day in the Alps created a bizarre finish to stage 9. The stage finish was in Monaco and included a short circuit around Monaco . Raymond Poulidor sprinted for the finish line that marked the start of the finishing circuit. Pou Pou thought he had won the stage and raised his hands in victory. He had forgotten about the remaining circuit. Jacques Anquetil took full advantage of the mistake and rode away with the stage win. Poulidor finished in the same time, but the stage win gave Anquetil a one-minute bonus .

SPECIAL NOTE : This one-minute bonus would become very important by the finish of the Tour.

Raymond Poulidor's bad luck continued during the next stage, the 20.8 km ITT from Hyeres to Toulon . Poulidor held a slim 15-second advantage over Anquetil and needed an extraordinary ride in the ITT. The effort was there for Poulidor but midway through the TT a puncture cost him valuable time. Anquetil won the stage, 36 seconds ahead of the ill-fated Pou Pou .

After the first of four stages in the Pyrenees Mountains , the Tour took its only rest day in Andorra . Rather than relax, Maitre Jacques, accompanied by his wife Janine, went out to a VIP party. He stuffed himself with barbecued lamb, and at one point a photographer captured him with a cigarette and glass of wine.

The next day, the race continued in the Pyrenees and a groggy Anquetil feeling the effects of the party struggled to keep pace. On the ascent of the Port d'Envalira, Poulidor and Bahamontes put the pressure on by upping the tempo. Anquetil was unable to follow the hard pace and faded back. A panicked team director Raphael Geminiani realized the seriousness of the situation and frantically searched for a solution. In the back seat of the team car Geminiani found a bottle of champagne, which was reserved for the victory celebration in Paris . Desperate for any remedy Geminiani filled a water bottle and handed it to the struggling Anquetil. By the top of the Port d'Envalira he trailed the Poulidor/Bahamontes group by 4 minutes. Anquetil let it all hang out on the descent and used his time trialing ability to catch the leading group. In Toulouse Maitre Jacques crossed the finish line in the same time as the leaders and saved his second place in the overall classification.

In the valley leading to Toulouse as the regrouping of 22 riders occurred, Poulidor broke a spoke. Quickly the team car changes the wheel, but an awkward push by the team mechanic sent Poulidor to the ground. The unfortunate “Pou Pou” lost 2 minutes by the finish. He now trailed Anquetil by 2'52”.

Needing to create something special, Poulidor used his anger from within to fuel an attack on the final climb of stage 15. Over the Col du Portillon, Poulidor was alone on the road. Into the finish in Luchon “Pou Pou” earned a 1'09” (1'43” on the Anquetil group) stage win. With the 1 minute time bonus, Poulidor jumped back into third place overall and trailed Anquetil by only 9 seconds.

With the Anquetil/Poulidor match-up taking center stage, the race offered a 42 km individual time trial (ITT). Both riders put forth great efforts with Anquetil winning the stage over Poulidor, who slowed by an untimely puncture. Maitre Anquetil donned the Maillot Jaune for the first time in 1964 and opened a 56 second lead on Poulidor. Paris was six stages away with two major challenges remaining, the stage finish at the top of the Puy de Dome and the final stage ITT into Paris .

Raymond Poulidor still had hope for the Maillot Jaune, but he must out distance arch rival Anquetil on the Puy de Dome to attain the goal. The 10 km climb had an average grade of 9% with the last 5 km at 13%.

When the climb of the Puy de Dome started, Spanish climber Julio Jimenez broke clear of the peloton and set a brutal pace up the climb. Fellow countryman Federico Bahamontes soon joins him in the breakaway. Anquetil and Poulidor matched each other move for move and dueled steadily up the climb. The battle on Puy de Dome was a classic: the weather was brutally hot, the crowd was large and very vocal, and the two Frenchmen were extended to the maximum. Maitre Jacques hid his pain well but in the final 1.5 km of the climb, Poulidor's pace cracked Anquetil. One bike length opened then two, then three and Poulidor hammered toward the finish. Across the line “Pou Pou” was third and the clock was ticking. A fading Anquetil struggled to the finish line 42 second behind Poulidor. Anquetil had saved his race lead by a scant 14 second. All eye turned to the final ITT into Paris .

Stage 22 was separated into two sections. In the morning section, the race was 119 km from Orleans to Versailles and in the afternoon section the race was the much anticipated 27 km ITT from Versailles to Paris . The atmosphere was electric throughout all of France . Not only was France celebrating Bastille Day , July 14th, but it was the finish of a classic TdF battle. Huge numbers of Anquetil fans contend with equally huge numbers of Poulidor fans along the race route. The Parc des Princes Velodrome in Paris , the official finish line, was filled to capacity.

At the intermediate time check Poulidor had forged a 5 second advantage. Anquetil, a time trial specialist, was losing time. Poulidor hit the finish line with the leading time of 37'31” and the Anquetil was the only rider still on the course. With the clock ticking, “Pou Pou” still had hope of overall victory. When Maitre Jacques entered into Parc des Princes Velodrome the crowd roared as he crossed the finish line in 37'10”. Still the master of the time trial, Anquetil had won the stage and gained his 5th Tour de France victory by a mere 55 seconds.

SPECIAL NOTE : Remember the one-minute bonus from stage 9. The unfortunate Raymond Poulidor would never wear the Maillot Jaune or win a TdF.

Stage and Distance

Stage Winner

Race Leader

Stage 1 RENNES-LISIEUX, 215 km

Edward Sels (Bel)

Edward Sels (Bel)

Stage 2 LISIEUX-AMIENS, 208 km

Andre Darrigade (Fra)

Edward Sels (Bel)

Stage 3a AMIENS-FOREST/Vorst, 197 km

Bernard Vandekerkhove (Bel)

Bernard Vandekerckhove (Bel)

Stage 4 FOREST/Vorst-METZ, 291 km

Rudi Altig (Ger)

Bernard Vandekerckhove (Bel)

Stage 5 METZ-FRIBOURG (Ger), 162 km

Willy Derboven (Bel)

Rudi Altig (Ger)

Stage 6 FRIBOURG (Ger)- BESANCON , 200 km

Henk Nijdam (Hol)

Rudi Altig (Ger)

Stage 7 BESANCON-THONON LES BAINS, 195 km

Jan Janssen (Hol)

Rudi Altig (Ger)

Stage 8 THONON LES BAINS-BRIANCON, 248 km

Federico Bahamontes (Spa)

Georges Groussard (Fra)

Stage 9 BRIANCON-MONACO, 239 km (see SPECIAL NOTES above)

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

Georges Groussard (Fra)

Stage 10a MONACO-HYERES, 188 km

Jan Janssen (Hol)

Georges Groussard (Fra)

Stage 10b HYERES-TOULON, 21 km ITT

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

Georges Groussard (Fra)

Stage 11 TOULON-MONTPELLIER, 250 km

Edward Sels (Bel)

Georges Groussard (Fra)

Stage 12 MONTPELLIER-PERPIGNAN, 174 km

Jo De Roo (Hol)

Georges Groussard (Fra)

Stage 13 PERPIGNAN-ANDORRA, 170 km

Julio Jimenez (Spa)

Georges Groussard (Fra)

Stage 14 ANDORRA-TOULOUSE, 186 km

Edward Sels (Bel)

Georges Groussard (Fra)

Stage 15 TOULOUSE-LUCHON, 203 km

Raymond Poulidor (Fra)

Georges Groussard (Fra)

Stage 16 LUCHON-PAU, 197 km

Federico Bahamontes (Spa)

Georges Groussard (Fra)

Stage 17 PEYREHORADE-BAYONNE, 42 km ITT

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

Stage 18 BAYONNE-BORDEAUX, 187 km

Andre Darrigade (Fra)

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

Stage 19 BORDEAUX-BRIVE, 216 km

Edward Sels (Bel)

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

Stage 20 BRIVE-CLERMONT FERRAND/ Puy de Dome, 237 km

Julio Jimenez (Spa)

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

Stage 21 CLERMONT FERRAND-ORLEANS, 311 km

Jean Stablinski (Fra)

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

Stage 22a ORLEANS-VERSAILLES, 119 km

Benoni Beheyt (Bel)

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

Stage 22b VERSAILLES-PARIS, 27 km ITT

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

Jacques Anquetil (Fra)

BEST CLIMBER PRIZE

Federico Bahamontes (Spa)

POINT'S COMPETITION

Jan Janssen (Hol)



TdF June 22 - July 14, 1964
4,504 Km

1. Jacques ANQUETIL (Fra) 127h09'44"

2. Raymond Poulidor (Fra) +55"

3. Federico Bahamontes (Spa) +4'44"

Starters: 132
Finishers: 81
Average Speed: 35.421 km/h

 

 

Return to the Timeline ToC

Return to the Race Snippets ToC

 
       
         
         
   



All materials are property of CyclingRevealed and Copyright © 2012
unless otherwise noted

Advertising Information | Contact Us
-